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INTRODUCTION

Lewistown High School is a four-year public high school serving District #97. The purpose of this booklet is to give students a brief outline of all courses taught at LHS. Included are course descriptions, prerequisites (courses you must have had previously), amount of credit given for each subject, required subjects, graduation requirements, grade reports, and honor roll.

SELECTION OF COURSES

Students should select subjects with the help and cooperation of the school adviser, teachers, and parents. Keep in mind future plans throughout the four years of high school and after graduation. It is advisable to take at least two courses in a department and more if possible so that you may obtain a good basic understanding of the subject area.

Parents are invited to visit the high school at any time concerning their student's choice of subjects or in regard to any other question or problem they might have.

SCHEDULE CHANGES

Schedule changes will be done by the school adviser. Schedule changes may be made the first five days of school and the first two days of the second semester. After that point, schedule changes will be made only at the initiation of a teacher, counselor or the principal. NOTE: Requests for schedule changes, class retakes and class audits must be processed through the adviser's office and authorized by the principal. Elective schedule changes will only be considered if the course request sheets are returned to the school adviser on time during the previous school year.

Schedule changes will be made if:

  1. It is possible in terms of your existing schedule and the change will not overload a class.

  2. The change results in a reasonable program of study in terms of the established curriculum.

  3. The changes are approved by the adviser and/or the principal.  

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

Students attending LHS for four years must meet all requirements to be eligible for graduation. Students must satisfactorily complete the following criteria:

 English            4 credits        Physical Education        4 credits*

Mathematics    3 credits*         Driver Education        ½ credit

Social Sciences  2 credits*         Health                ½ credit

Science            2 credits*         Elective            1 credit*

Consumer Education    ½ credit       

  • 1 credit must be in Algebra and 1 credit must be in Geometry
  • ½ credit in Social Studies must be in Civics & 1 credit must be in US History - Gr. 11

  • 1 credit in General Science - Gr. 9; 1 credit in Biology  - Gr. 10

  • 4 credits are required in PE unless student is exempt due to PE waiver, see later in book.

  • Music, Art, Foreign Language, Ag, Tech, Family & Consumer Sciences and Computers are all vocational/technical course areas.

In addition to the required courses, no student shall receive a certificate of graduation without passing an examination on American patriotism and the principles of representative government, as enunciated in the American Declaration of Independence, the Constitution of the United States of America and the Constitution of the State of Illinois

A unit of credit is given for the successful completion of a course which, meets approximately 46 minutes every day, 5 days per week period, for at least 36 weeks, or the equivalent amount of time during the school year. A ½ credit is earned per semester for each course upon the successful completion, as described in the course description. Titles or courses to be included in this category will be determined by the instructional staff and administration.

Successful completion of the Constitution exam, Consumer Education, and Health Education shall be certified by the filing of a list of student completion, signed by the teacher, with the principal's office. Students may fulfill the Consumer Education requirement by successfully completing an approved course (Adult Living, Agribusiness Management, or online Personal Finance) or by passing the Illinois Consumer Education Proficiency Exam.

*Successful completion of Physical Education for 8 semesters is required of all students. The only exceptions are: (1) student graduates at the end of the 7th semester, and/or (2) exemptions as permitted by law. These exemptions are explained at the end of this booklet.

Drivers Education is only available to students after they have passed 8 academic classes during the previous 2 semesters as per a State Bill passed by the Governor in August 1993.

 TRANSFER STUDENTS

Transfer students will have their transcripts evaluated upon enrollment to determine the number of credits needed and classes that must be taken to satisfy graduation requirements.

DUAL CREDIT CLASSES

Students may enroll in both academic and vocational/technical Dual Credit Courses to attain credit towards high school graduation and for college credit through Spoon River College or Western Area Career Systems (WACS). Students are required to take the AccuPlacer test through Spoon River College and score at the specified level required for college admittance to be eligible to enroll in any Dual Credit Course. This specified score is determined by Spoon River College. Once students have qualified to enroll in Dual Credit Courses, they are encouraged to do so under the following restrictions: students may take any and all academic courses available through instructors on the Lewistown High School campus. The number of these said courses may vary from year to year. Per Spoon River College's policy, students may not enroll in more than 13 semester college hours each semester. Vocational/technical Dual Credit Courses are limited to one course per school year.

 

COLLEGE DUAL CREDIT CLASSES

 A student who successfully completes these courses may receive high school credit, provided:

  1. The class is taken as part of the regular school day (7 classes).

  2. The course is approved in advance by the high school adviser and the high school principal.

  3. The student assumes responsibility for all fees.

  4. The course is completed according to the local school calendar.

The course will count toward GPA/class rank and extracurricular eligibility.

 INTERNET/ONLINE CLASSES

 A student who successfully completes a course may receive high school credit, provided:

  1. The class is taken as part of the regular school day.

  2. The course is approved in advance by the high school adviser and the high school principal

  3. The student assumes responsibility for all fees

  4. The course will count toward GPA/class rank

  5. The course will count towards extracurricular eligibility.  

  6. The course is completed according to the local school calendar.

  7. If a student withdraws from an internet/online course, they must do so within one week from the start of the class, and must choose another online class at the student's expense.

  8. After one week, if a student withdraws/drops from a class which is taught by a Spoon River College instructor on Lewistown High School's campus OR an online college course through SRC, WIU, or other college, the student will be required to enroll in an online course (Edgenuity or Illinois Virtual school) at the student's expense.

 

WEIGHTED COURSES

 Academic courses taken as Dual Credit offerings with an instructor on campus at Lewistown High School will receive "weighted" status. Courses with "weighted" status include:  Dual Credit Speech (COM103), Dual Credit College Algebra (MAT125), Dual Credit Statistics (MAT132), Dual Credit Music Appreciation (MUS111 & MUS102), Honors English III, Honors English IV, Calculus, Physics, and Chemistry II. With "weighted" status, each letter grade bears one point higher value, with the exception of an F - which receives no credit or point value towards GPA. Please see below:


Non-weighted

Weighted

A = 4.0 points

B = 3.0 points

C = 2.0 points

D = 1.0 point

F = 0.0 points

A = 5.0 points

B = 4.0 points

C = 3.0 points

D = 2.0 points

F = 0.0 points



HONOR ROLL AND GRADE REPORTS

 To qualify for the high honor roll, a student must have at least a 4.0 average or better. To qualify for the honor roll a student must obtain a 3.5 to 3.99 GPA. To receive honorable mention, a student must have a 3.0 to 3.49 GPA.  Points for grades are assigned as follows: A=4 points; B=3 points; C=2 points; D=1 point and an F=0 points. Grades for non-academic subjects do not count toward the honor roll average. These classes include, Drivers Ed, PE, Coop Work Experience, and Study Skills. A student cannot have a grade lower than a C- to be included on the honor roll.

COURSE LISTING

 ENGLISH

 ENGLISH I (1 credit) Grade 9

In addition to a review of English grammar and usage, the course will cover a variety of literary forms such as short story, poetry, plays, and novels. Besides a library unit, this course will include the development of writing skills. REQUIREMENTS FOR CREDIT FOR THIS COURSE INCLUDE COMPLETION OF ALL ASSIGNED THEMES, COMPOSITIONS, AND REPORTS. FAILURE TO FULFILL THESE REQUIREMENTS RESULTS IN NO CREDIT FOR THIS COURSE

ENGLISH II (1 credit) Grade 10

This course will cover an expansion of grammar and usage fundamental with an emphasis on the further development of writing skills.  Student will review literary forms such as the short story, poem, and novel. REQUIREMENTS FOR CREDIT FOR THIS COURSE INCLUDE COMPLETION OF ALL ASSIGNED THEMES, COMPOSITIONS, AND REPORTS. FAILURE TO FULFILL THESE REQUIREMENTS RESULTS IN NO CREDIT FOR THIS COURSE.

SPEECH (½ credit) Grades 11, 12

This semester course will prepare students to give an effective speech and to communicate more effectively.  The course will emphasize speaking for business and career, special occasions, contest, and mass media. In addition, famous speeches in history will be studied.  The student will be required to give speeches and interviews. REQUIREMENTS FOR CREDIT FOR THIS COURSE INCLUDE COMPLETION OF ALL ASSIGNED PROJECTS. FAILURE TO FULFILL THESE REQUIREMENTS RESULTS IN NO CREDIT FOR THIS COURSE.

SPEECH (DUAL CREDIT) (½ credit) Grade 11, 12

This course is offered as dual credit through Spoon River College. Emphasis is on philosophy and principles of the interrelated components of all verbal communication. Students will learn specific skills of public communication including those involved in small group discussion, informative speaking, and persuasive speaking. Students will also be asked to demonstrate their knowledge of communication through the analysis of the specific components of the communication model and through testing.  Students must participate in all the oral presentations and demonstrate an understanding of the communication principles to pass this course. Students will only be given credit for GPA (high school and college credit) for dual credit speech when taken during the regular school day or during an Early Bird offering. *This is a weighted class. $10 Instructional materials fee required.

 

ENGLISH III (1 credit) Grade 11

This course will review grammar and its application in basic composition. Students will write themes, a research paper, and technical papers. The literature will include a variety of works, such as poetry, short stories, and novels. REQUIREMENTS FOR CREDIT FOR THIS COURSE INCLUDE COMPLETION OF ALL ASSIGNED THEMES, COMPOSITIONS, AND REPORTS. FAILURE TO FULFILL THESE REQUIREMENTS RESULTS IN NO CREDIT FOR THIS COURSE.

HONORS ENGLISH III* (1 credit) Grade 11

This course will entail a basic review of grammar and the application of advanced principles of grammar in conjunction with the writing unit, which will include basic themes, creative compositions, and a research paper. A survey of American literature will also be included to provide the students with a literary background of our American heritage. Poetry, short stories, and novels will be studied in depth. The emphasis of all of these skills is necessary to do college level writing and to succeed in college level literature course. REQUIREMENTS FOR CREDIT FOR THIS COURSE INCLUDE COMPLETION OF ALL ASSIGNED THEMES, COMPOSITIONS, AND REPORTS. FAILURE TO FULFILL THESE REQUIREMENTS RESULTS IN NO CREDIT FOR THIS COURSE. *This is a weighted class.

ENGLISH IV (1 credit) Grade 12

In addition to a review of English grammar and usage, the course will include the study of different forms of writing, including technical writings, letter writings, and compositions. Literature will be an important part of this course, requiring the study of short stories, poems, plays and novels. REQUIREMENTS FOR CREDIT FOR THIS COURSE INCLUDE COMPLETION OF ALL ASSIGNED THEMES, COMPOSITIONS, AND REPORTS. FAILURE TO FULFILL THESE REQUIREMENTS RESULTS IN NO CREDIT FOR THIS COURSE.

HONORS ENGLISH IV* (1 credit) Grade 12

This advanced course is offered as a dual credit class through Spoon River College.  Students have the opportunity to earn college credit. This opportunity can give an entering college freshman an advantage in registering and in graduating. This course will emphasize a practical application of grammar usage, a concentration on writing, and a study of British literature. This course will further prepare students for the writing required on the college level and provide the student with a strong literary history and a better understanding of the basic forms of literature. REQUIREMENTS FOR CREDIT FOR THIS COURSE INCLUDE COMPLETION OF ALL ASSIGNED THEMES, COMPOSITIONS, AND ORAL REPORTS. FAILURE TO FULFILL THESE REQUIREMENTS RESULTS IN NO CREDIT FOR THIS COURSE. *This is a weighted class. $10 Instructional materials fee required.

CREATIVE WRITING (1 credit) Grades 10, 11, 12

Creative Writing courses offer students the opportunity to develop and improve their technique and individual style in poetry, short story, drama, essays, and other forms of prose. The emphasis of the courses is on writing; however, students may study exemplary representations and authors to obtain a fuller appreciation of the form and craft. Although most creative writing classes cover several expressive forms, others concentrate exclusively on one particular form (such as poetry or playwriting).

 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE

SPANISH I (1 credit) Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

The beginning course is designed to help each student attain proficiency in the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing within a minimum period of time and in a way that makes language learning a meaningful activity. Students will quickly learn to speak about themselves, their interests, feelings, and activities. The four basic skills plus the basics of Spanish grammar and vocabulary are presented within the context of meaningful short stories, songs, and skits. Students are actively involved. Students must complete and turn in all major assignments in order to receive a passing grade.

SPANISH II (1 credit) Grades 10, 11, 12

This intermediate course reviews the material covered in Spanish I and continues to build student skills and abilities. Students will feel comfortable communicating almost entirely in Spanish through a broad variety of interactive and communicative activities. Creativity is stressed and encouraged with several class projects. Students continue to build appreciation for Hispanic cultures and civilizations. Completion of the basic grammar concepts allows students to speak and write in present, past, and future tenses. Students must complete and turn in all major assignments in order to receive a passing grade.

ADVANCED SPANISH (1 credit) Grades 11, 12

This advanced course reviews the basic concepts and vocabulary covered in Spanish II, while continuing to explain vocabulary and build a more profound foundation in grammar. Students do not have difficulty with the class being conducted almost entirely in Spanish. Cultural notes are plentiful. Students read and write short stories and discuss the content. Creative activities take the form of skits, scrapbooks, and posters, to mention a few forms of expression. The methodology is very effective for developing oral proficiency among non-native Spanish speakers.

MATHEMATICS

BASIC ALGEBRA (1 credit) Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

This course is geared for the non-college bound student.  Basic Algebra topics will be covered with an emphasis on real-life applications. This course will satisfy the Algebra requirement for graduation.

ALGEBRA I (1 credit) Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

This course contains the standard topics of Algebra I. Signed numbers are heavily emphasized, as are integer exponents and scientific notation. Linear equations and applications are a focus. Systems of two linear equations in two unknowns, graphs, and equations of linear functions are heavily emphasized. Scientific conversion problems prepare students for science courses.

Exponential equations are studied as an extension of linear equations.  Statistics is covered in with the analysis of two-variable data. Lastly the course concludes with an introduction to the quadratic function, to prepare for Advanced Algebra. Story problems are in almost all problem sets. *Geometry may be taken after successfully completing this course.

GEOMETRY (1 credit) Grades 10, 11, 12

This course helps the student understand the basic structure of geometry. Angle relationships, parallel and perpendicular lines, congruent triangles, similar polygon, circles, constructions, loci, areas of polygons and circles, and areas and volumes of solids are studied in depth. The student grows in understanding of the deductive method and in appreciation of the need for precision of language; powers of spatial visualization; and knowledge of the relationships among geometric elements are developed. Prerequisite: Algebra I

ALGEBRA II (1 credit) Grades 10, 11, 12

This course is designed to complete the fundamental skills of algebra. Topics include chemical mixture problems, systems of two and three linear equations, systems of nonlinear equations, and complex numbers, with a  heavy concentration on the quadratic function and its applications. Prerequisite: Algebra I

TRANSITIONS MATH (1 credit) Grade 12

Math course framework built around essential algebraic competencies designed to prepare students for college and career pathways in areas such as: Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math or STEM which require advanced algebraic skills or calculus. Course design will enable students to transition directly into credit bearing college-level algebra courses. Students will engage in deepening conceptual understanding using algebra and mathematical applications of algebra and functions and how functions naturally arise using authentic modeling situations. The function families (linear, polynomial, rational, radical, and exponential) will be emphasized. Additionally, the course shall emphasize the eight mathematical practices, particularly modeling within the setting of authentic and contextualized applications, and upon completion, the student should be able to: demonstrate and justify both orally and in writing conceptual understanding of functions combined with advanced algebraic knowledge to solve complex, contextualized, multi-step problems in authentic settings.

PRE-CALCULUS (1 credit) Grades 11, 12

This course will complete the topics of algebra and trigonometry. Topics include more in-depth trigonometry, trigonometric identities, and probability design.  Prerequisite: Algebra II.  

COLLEGE ALGEBRA* (½ credit) Grade 11, 12

Currently offered as a Dual Credit Hybrid course taught by Spoon River College instructors.

College Algebra is designed to develop the algebra skills necessary for success in higher level math and science courses.  With extensive use of computer software, topics to be covered in this course include: exponential and logarithmic functions, linear and quadratic functions, higher-degree polynomial and rational functions, inverses and combinations of functions, graphs and graphical translations, circles, complex numbers, systems of equations, and the binomial theorem. This is a weighted class.  Students who do not pass the course, or who decide to withraw, will be responsible for reimbursing LCUSD#97 a total of $510.00 (or whatever the cost in a given semester) for the course.

STATISTICS* (½ credit) Grade 11, 12

Currently offered as a Dual Credit Hybrid course taught by Spoon River College instructors.

This is an introductory course in statistics requiring a minimum of mathematical preparation.  Topics to be covered include descriptive methods (frequency distributions, graphig, and measures of location and variation), basic probability theory (sample spaces, counting, factorials, combinations, permutations, and probability laws), probability distributions (normal distributions and normal curve, binomial distribution, and random samples and sampling techniques), statistical inference (estimation, hypothesis testing, t-test and chi-square test, and errors), and correlation and regression. This is a weighted class.   Students who do not pass the course, or who decide to withraw, will be responsible for reimbursing LCUSD#97 a total of $510.00 (or whatever the cost in a given semester) for the course.

CALCULUS WITH ANALYTIC GEOMETRY* (1 credit) Grade 12

Will be offered as a Dual Credit Hybrid course taught by Spoon River College instructors. Calculus with Analytic Geometry I involves the study of the derivative and integral of elementary functions with applications and analytic geometry.  Topics to be covered in this course include: limits and continuity, differentiation, optimization, related rates, Newton's Method, integration, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, areas between curves, solids of revolution, and other applications.  (IAI: M1 900-1) (MTH-901). Prerequisites: MAT 125 and MAT 126 with grades of C or better, Testing Criteria, or Equivalent. This is a weighted class.   Students who do not pass the course, or who decide to withraw, will be responsible for reimbursing LCUSD#97 a total of $510.00 (or whatever the cost in a given semester) for the course.

CALCULUS WITH ANALYTIC GEOMETRY II *

Will be offered as a Dual Credit Hybrid course taught by Spoon River College instructors. Calculus with Analytic Geometry II involves further study of the derivative and integral of elementary function and applications.  Topics to be studied in this course include: new techniques of integration, Trapezoidal and Simpson's Rules, sequences and series, Taylor polynomials, separable and linear differential equations, conic sections, polar coordinates, and applications. (IAI: M1 900-2) (MTH-902). Prerequisite:  MAT 151 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent. This is a weighted class.   Students who do not pass the course, or who decide to withraw, will be responsible for reimbursing LCUSD#97 a total of $510.00 (or whatever the cost in a given semester) for the course.

SCIENCE  

GENERAL SCIENCE (1 credit) Grade 9

General Science is a survey of chemistry, physics, and earth science. This course provides a basic background and understanding of all areas of the general sciences and their relationships to our daily lives.  Labs and projects reinforce these studies. *$10 Instructional materials fee required.

BIOLOGY I (1 credit) Grade 10  

Biology is the study of living things. This course will include microbiology, cellular biology, genetics, and zoology. Students will study classification of living organisms, with a second semester emphasis on the Animal Kingdom. *$10 Instructional materials fee required.

03004A000 ASTRONOMY  (1/2 credit) Science Elective for Grades 9 - 12

Astronomy courses offer students the opportunity to study the solar system, stars, galaxies, and interstellar bodies. These courses usually introduce and use astronomic instruments and typically explore theories regarding the origin and evolution of the universe, space, and time.

03212A000 EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN (1/2 credit) Science Elective for Grades 9 - 12

In Scientific Research and Design courses, students conceive of, design, and complete a project using scientific inquiry and experimentation methodologies. Emphasis is typically placed on safety issues, research protocols, controlling or manipulating variables, data analysis, and a coherent display of the project and its outcome(s).

ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY (1 credit) Grades 11,12

Usually taken after a comprehensive initial study of biology, Anatomy and Physiology courses present the human body and biological systems in more detail. In order to understand the structure of the human body and its functions, students learn anatomical terminology, study cells and tissues, explore functional systems (skeletal, muscular, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, reproductive, nervous, and so on), and may dissect mammals.

BIOLOGY II (1 credit) Grades 11, 12

This course will cover Biochemistry, Genetics, Biotechnology, and Human Anatomy and Physiology. Scientific method and experimentation will be emphasized. Labs include photosynthesis, fruit-fly genetics, DNA modeling, DNA gel electrophoresis, dissection of cow and sheep anatomy, and fetal pig dissection. Biology II is an excellent course for anyone interested in majoring in biology or the medical field.  Prerequisite: Biology I & Chemistry I recommended. *$10 Instructional materials fees required.

CHEMISTRY I (1 credit) Grades 11, 12

Chemistry I is an introduction to the elements, the structure of the atom, the Periodic table, compound formation, laboratory methods, and basic chemistry principles. Chemistry deals with the structure and composition of the materials that make up our environment and the changes they undergo. Mathematical relationships between variable in experiments are developed. Prerequisite: Algebra I *$10 Instructional material fee required.

CHEMISTRY II* (1 credit) Grades 11, 12

Usually taken after a comprehensive initial study of chemistry, Chemistry-Advanced Studies courses cover chemical properties and interactions in more detail. Advanced chemistry topics include organic chemistry, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, macromolecules, kinetic theory, and nuclear chemistry. This is a weighted class and is currently offered every other year.

PHYSICS I*(1 credit) Grade 12

Physics is the study of energy and matter and how they are related. It is a course recommended for junior & senior students with a basic science and Algebra background. Science inquiry, experimentation and problem-solving are applied in this course. Physics I primarily deals with mechanics - the study of bodies in motion. Mechanics is broken down to the two branches of kinematics and dynamics; the study of how bodies move and why bodies move.  Newton's three laws are investigated along with topics such as error analysis, graphical analysis, accuracy and precision in measurement, forces, work, power and wave motion. Extensive work is also done with static and current electricity during the second semester. The study of Physics is utilized by classroom lecture, labs, videos, computer investigation and discussion. Physics may serve as a useful course to the college-bound and vocational/technical-technical student. Prerequisite: Algebra II *$10 Instructional materials fee required. This is a weighted class and is currently offered every other year.

SOCIAL SCIENCE

CURRENT EVENTS (½ credit) Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

The purpose of this course is to give the student an opportunity to gain greater awareness of  U.S. and world events. Upon completion of the course, the student should have gained social and cultural awareness, learned to follow the news from a variety of media sources, gained experience in written and oral expression, and learned to effectively research news information both over the internet and through traditional media sources. This class may be taken as a semester or year class with ½ credit per semester and may be repeated for additional credit.

GEOGRAPHY (½ credit) Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

This semester course includes a comprehensive study of the basic concepts and principles of both physical and cultural geography. Goals of the course are to develop an understanding of the principles of physical geography, to gain knowledge related to the various cultural regions of the world, and to build a geographic literacy through which the student may gain a greater appreciation of the earth and its many different peoples.

CIVICS/SERVICE LEARNING (½ credit) Grades 9,10,11,12                                                                                                              This semester course is a study of the federal, state, and local levels of government. It includes studies acquainting the student with U.S. politics, court procedures, foreign affairs, special interest groups, voting, public opinion, current governmental issues, and the importance of community service activities (Service Learning Project). Illinois law also requires all students to pass the Constitution test, which covers the Federal and State Constitutions, Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Flag, and voting procedures. That test is given through this required class.

WORLD HISTORY (1 credit) Grades 9,10, 11, 12

The major purpose of this course is to make available to high school students a survey of world history that will help them understand their own times. In this class we attempt to present history so that the student can see the world in all its inter-relationships, rather than as isolated nations and civilizations. We also try to show the continuity of history and the sweeping forces of historical cause and effect. Emphasis is given to political developments and the growth of ideas, religions, art, and other civilizing forces.

U.S. HISTORY (1 credit) Grade 11

This junior-level course is a survey of U.S. History from the colonial period through present time. This course will also cover accounts in history representing: women's history, people with disabilities and the disability rights movement, the Congressional Medal of Honor, and the role and contributions of minority groups in our nation's history.

CONTEMPORARY HISTORY (1 credit) Grade 10,11,12

This upper level course will provide more in depth coverage of the U.S. contemporary history beginning with the early 20th century and continuing through today's evolving historical events. Some of the major areas of study will include World War II, the Cold War, the Korean War, the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War, the Women's Movement, and America's changing role in the world today. As American's history continues to evolve and expand this additional course is needed to give the students a more complete picture of our country and the world we live in. This course is currently offered every other year.

 SOCIOLOGY (1 credit) Grades 10,11, 12

Sociology is the science that deals with the investigation and analysis of human relationships. This particular course looks very closely at the causes, conditions and consequences of relationships both at the group and individual level. An in-depth study of controversial issues, teenage concerns and social problems highlight the discussion aspect of this course. This course is currently offered every other year.

 PHYSICAL EDUCATION

 PHYSICAL EDUCATION (1 credit per year)

Four years of physical education is required of all students unless a medical excuse is presented for non-participation or a student meets one of the exemptions as listed in the LHS Physical Education Exemption Policy. Various forms of sports, games, and other conditioning programs are included in the course. Some of the activities students will participate in are calisthenics, softball, basketball, volleyball, pickle ball, soccer, universal weight conditioning, kickball, golf, badminton, and physical fitness testing. The required dress for physical education is a solid gray or white shirt and red shorts with white socks and tennis shoes. All students are required to have appropriate clothing (such as sweat clothes or warm-up suit) for outdoor activities.

* $5.00 Instructional fee required.

 HEALTH EDUCATION (½ credit) Grade 9, 10

Health Education is a required semester-long course. A passing grade in Health is a graduation requirement. The course includes the study of such topics as alcohol and drug abuse, health quackery, first aid and CPR, mental health, body systems, AIDS, sexually transmitted disease, communicable diseases, safety, human reproduction, foods and nutrition, tobacco and smoking, dental health, hygiene, and the use/abuse of steroids. *$10 Instructional material fee required.

DRIVER EDUCATION (½ credit) Grades 9, 10, 11

The course consists of at least thirty (30) hours of classroom instruction and generally six (6) hours behind-the-wheel instruction. Sophomore students will be scheduled for the behind-the-wheel phase according to age, oldest first. Drivers Education is only available to students after they have passed 8 academic classes during the previous 2 semesters. REQUIREMENT FOR THIS COURSE INCLUDES COMPLETION OF ACCIDENT NOTEBOOK. FAILURE TO FULFILL THIS REQUIREMENT RESULTS IN NO CREDIT FOR THIS COURSE. *$100.00 Instructional materials fee required. The cost of driving permit not included in this fee.

MUSIC & ART

BAND (1 credit) Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

Band is both an academic subject and a performing organization. It performs for all home football and basketball games, several parades, and concerts. Performances are a part of the grade and any missed performances must be made up by doing extra credit work. Individual and group skills that will be worked on in the course include: technique, theory, ear training, music history, and expression. Individuals are encouraged to better their music skills by participation in various festivals and the IHSA Solo and Ensemble Contest.

CHORUS (1 credit) Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

Chorus is both an academic subject and a performing organization.  The chorus performs concerts and school and in the community. Performances are a part of the grade and any missed performances must be made up by doing extra credit work.  Technique, theory, ear training, music history, expression, and diction are studied. Individuals are encouraged to better their musical skills by participation in various music festivals and the IHSA Solo and Ensemble Contest.

MUSIC APPRECIATION--Introduction to American Music  (½ credit) Grades 10, 11, 12

Survey of major contributions of American music and composers, including symphonic, jazz, and popular forms.  Explore the styles of popular music in America and broaden understanding of the culture of the time. This course is offered as dual credit and is a weighted class.

MUSIC APPRECIATION  (½ credit) Grades 10, 11, 12

This course gives the student the opportunity to study the general field of music and to broaden musical understanding and enjoyment through listening and discussion. This course is offered as dual credit and is a weighted class.

INTRODUCTION TO ART  (½  credit) Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

This course provides students with the knowledge and opportunity to explore an art form and to create individual works of art. Initial courses cover the language, materials, and processes of a particular art form and the design elements and principles supporting a work of art. As students advance and become more adept, the instruction regarding the creative process becomes more refined, and students are encouraged to develop their own artistic styles. The course also includes the study of major artists, art movements, and styles.

DRAWING/PAINTING  (½ credit) Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

Drawing/Painting courses focus on media and methods.. In keeping with this attention on two-dimensional work, students typically work with several media (such as pen-and-ink, pencil, chalk, watercolor, tempera, oils, acrylics, and so on), but some courses may focus on only one medium. Prerequisite:  Introduction to Art or teacher approval.

SCULPTURE  (½  credit) Grades 10, 11, 12

Sculpture courses focus on creating three-dimensional works. Students typically work with several media (such as clay, ceramics, wood, metals, textiles, recycled materials, etc.), but some courses may focus on only one medium. Prerequisite:  Introduction to Art or teacher approval.

CERAMICS  (½  credit) Grades 10, 11, 12

Ceramics/Pottery courses cover the same topics as Creative Art-Comprehensive courses, but focus on creating three-dimensional works out of clay and ceramic material, including hand-built methods and a basic introduction to the pottery wheel. Particular attention is paid to the characteristics of the raw materials, their transformation under heat, and the various methods used to create and finish objects. Prerequisite:  Introduction to Art or teacher approval.

GRAPHIC DESIGN (1 credit) Grades 10, 11, 12

Graphic Design courses emphasize design elements and principles in the purposeful arrangement of images and text to communicate a message. They focus on creating art products such as advertisements, product designs, and identity symbols. Students apply understanding of graphic design programs and their respective tools to create simple and complex projects. Prerequisite: Introduction to Art or teacher approval.

LEGEND I (1 credit) Grades 11, 12

In this course students learn skills used in business.  From start to finish students learn the process of creating a professional publication. Through hands-on experience students learn about product distribution, techniques of selling, sales management, sales support activities, pricing promotion, purchasing, financing, and market information.  This class produces the yearbook for the school and also programs, flyers, and media presentation. Additionally, Internet Safety concerns will be addressed in this class. Prerequisite: Graphic Design or Teacher approval required.

LEGEND II (1 credit) Grade 12

This course builds on the knowledge and concepts covered in Legend I.  Concepts such as risk management and market analysis will be emphasized along with the decision making process used to solve problems. Students will use cutting-edge technology, integrated software packages, and cross-curricular resources in the production phase of the class. Additionally, Internet Safety concerns will be addressed in this class.  Prerequisite: Legend I.

VOCATIONAL/TECHNICAL COURSES

AGRICULTURAL

INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE (1 credit) Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

Course Description (ISBE ID:18001A001):  This course is a yearlong, basic overview of the industry, diversity, and opportunities of agriculture. Students will learn fundamental concepts from several subsections of agriculture including animal science, plant science, leadership, and technology.

*$10 Instructional materials fee required.

AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE (1 credit) Grades 10, 11, 12

Major units of instruction include agricultural research, soil science, advanced plant science, biotechnology, advanced animal science. Applied science and math skills and concepts will be stressed throughout the course as they relate to each area. Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus. Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.

PLANT & ANIMAL SCIENCE (1 credit) Grades 10, 11, 12
Course Description (ISBE ID:    ): This course is designed to reinforce and extend students understanding of science by associating basic scientific principles and concepts with relevant applications in agriculture. Students will examine major phases of growth, development, and management in agriculture and the specific biological science concepts that govern management decisions in crop and animal production.  Topics of study will start with fundamental principles of biology including cell structure, cell division, and genetics, then students will compare and contrast the life cycles, nutritional and environmental requirements, and how plants and animals relate to one another in specific production operations and ecosystems. The course will be valuable preparation for further education and will increase the relevance of science through the applied setting of agriculture by enhancing literacy in science and the scientific process.

AG MECHANICS(1 credit) Grades 10, 11, 12
Course Description (ISBE ID:18402A001): This course is a yearlong, hands-on, second step to Introduction to Agriculture. The curriculum will include fundamental instruction in ag construction, small engine repair, and welding while strengthening problem solving and applied mathematics skills.

*$30 Instructional materials fee required.

18201A001 - AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT*  (1 credit) Grades 11, 12

This course is a yearlong, agriculture focused business class that earns students their required half credit of Consumer Education. Beyond that, students will gain more perspective on the processes of owning, managing, and financing a business.

*This course satisfies the state of Illinois' Consumer Education requirement.

 AG LEADERSHIP (1 credit preferably FFA Officers and active members) Grades 11, 12

Course Description (ISBE ID:18203A002):  Students will analyze current agricultural issues,  determine how they affect people on all sides of the issue and enhance their written and oral communication skills by presenting their views and opinions to the class through debates, speeches, and interviews in order to be effective leaders in today's society. Students will gain the knowledge and leadership experiences to help them to become successful in life and in the workplace; thus, enhancing their potential for leadership development, personal growth, and career success

HORTICULTURE (1 credit) Grades 11, 12

Course Description (ISBE ID:18051A001): This advanced course offers instruction in both the greenhouse production and landscape areas of horticulture.  Units of study include plant identification, greenhouse management, growing greenhouse crops, landscape design, installation, and maintenance, horticulture mechanics, nursery management, and turf production.  Agribusiness units will cover operating a horticultural business, pricing work, advertising, and sales.

18504A001 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE CTE Course (1 credit) Grades 10, 11, 12

This course examines the relationship of agriculture and the environment. The impact of plant and animal production practices on the environment and the adoption of practices leading to improved air, land, and water quality are investigated. Areas of emphasis include: types of ecosystems, management of waste, chemical use, soil conservation, land uses and regulations, and water and air quality. Encouraging students to be conscious and concerned about the environment and recognizing the need to conserve the environment and its resources will be a theme throughout. Careers of environmental technicians, soil and water conservationists, monitoring field technicians, land surveyor, and related occupations will be examined. Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus. Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.

18504A002 NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT   CTE Course (1 credit) Grades 10, 11, 12

This course develops management and conservation skills in understanding the connection between agriculture and natural resources. Student knowledge and skills are developed in: understanding natural resources and its importance; fish, wildlife, and forestry management and conservation; and exploring outdoor recreational enterprises. Hunting and fishing as a sport, growing and managing tree forests, and outdoor safety education will be featured. Career exploration will be discussed including: park ranger, game warden, campground manager, forester, conservation officer, wildlife manager, and related occupations. Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus. Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.

 COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY

10004A001 - COMPUTER CONCEPTS AND SOFTWARE APPLICATIONS (½ credit) Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

Computer Concepts and Software Applications is an orientation-level course designed to develop awareness and understanding of application software and equipment used by employees. Students will apply problem-solving skills to hands-on, real-life situations using a variety of software applications, such as word processing, spreadsheets, database management, presentation software, and desktop publishing. Students will explore topics related to computer concepts, operating systems, telecommunications and emerging technologies. The development of employability skills, as well as transition skills, will be included in the course as well as an understanding of the ethical considerations that arise in using information processing equipment and gaining access to available databases.

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE (Home Economics)

ORIENTATION TO FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCE: CHILD GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT (1 credit) Grade 9

This program is a series of planned learning experiences emphasizing the following area:

  1. Clothing and Textiles (required: sewing supplies, project materials, and a completed project)

  2. Resource Management

  3. Foods and Nutrition ($6.50 lab fee)

  4. Housing, Furnishings and Equipment

  5. Human Development and Family Relationships

  6. Introduction to the World of Work

*$10 Instructional materials fee required.

FASHION DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION (½ credit) Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

 19201A001 This course is designed to provide basic knowledge and understanding of the design, development, and production of textile products. Through hands-on and project based learning experiences students will discover fiber characteristics, fabric construction methods, elements of science and design in textiles and apparel, and basic construction skills used in interior furnishings and apparel industries. This course emphasizes awareness and investigation of careers and industry trends in textiles.

FOODS-NUTRITION I (½ credit) Grades 10, 11, 12

This course includes basic classroom and laboratory experiences needed to develop knowledge and understanding of basic food principles and applied nutrition for all ages. The course content centers around the following areas:  food buying, safety, sanitation and preparation techniques. Information related to careers in foods and nutrition is incorporated throughout the course. *$10 Instructional materials fee required.

FOODS-NUTRITION II (Foods II) (½ credit) Grades 10, 11, 12

In this course more attention is paid to food selection and preparation for special circumstances and dietary needs. Laboratory sessions are devoted to the preparation of foods with specific characteristics.  Course content should include the following areas: careers in foods and nutrition, influences on food customs, diet and health, current nutritional issues, planning for special need, safety of foods, food purchasing, prevention of food-borne illnesses and food preservation. Prerequisite: Foods-Nutrition I $10 Instructional materials fee required.

PARENTING (½ credit) Grades 10, 11, 12

This course is designed to help students think through the responsibilities, satisfactions and stresses of parenthood. Many types of parenting situations are examined. Stress prevention and management and the work community agencies that help parents deal with various types of parenting crises are emphasized. The course content includes applying decision-making and goal-setting skills; applying the basic principles of the parenting process; practicing health and safety standards as related to parenting; providing experience which encourage parents and children to maximize resources; encouraging human relations skills in children/adolescents; and evaluating impact on parenting of family and career changes. Special attention is given to the needs of teenage parents and the importance of readiness for parenthood *$10 Instructional materials fee required.

ADULT LIVING* (½ credit) Grades 11, 12

This course focuses on the identification and management of personal and family resources to meet the needs, values, and wants of individuals and families throughout the life cycle. The course utilizes a variety of project-based experiences and service learning opportunities to gain knowledge and expertise in understanding and applying management skills, with consideration to diverse social, economic, technological, environmental, and cultural characteristics of individuals and families. Topics include: consumer rights and responsibilities in the marketplace; financial responsibility and decision making; planning and money management; credit and debt; risk management and insurance; saving and investment; homeownership; state and federal taxes; electronic banking; and current issues in the economy. *This course satisfies the state of Illinois' Consumer Education requirement.

INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY

CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY I (1 credit) Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

Construction Technology is a course designed to foster an awareness and understanding of construction trades and to introduce students to the various kinds of woods used in industry and offer experience in using selected woodworking tools. Students design and construct one or more projects and may prepare a bill of materials. Correct and safe use of tools and equipment is emphasized. As students advance, they focus on learning the terminology necessary to use power tools successfully, developing skills to safely use these tools in the workshop and becoming familiar with various kinds of wood-finishing materials.

PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY (1 credit) Grades 10, 11, 12

This is a course designed to foster an awareness and understanding of manufacturing. Through a variety of learning activities, students are exposed to many career opportunities in the production field. Experience in manufacturing include product design, materials, and corporate structure, management, research and development, production planning, mass production, marketing and servicing. Prerequisite: Technology I *$10.00 Instructional materials fee required.

CONSTRUCTION TRADES (1 credit) Grades 11, 12

This course provides experiences related to the erection, installation, and maintenance of residential buildings and related fixtures. Planned learning activities allow students to understand fundamental principles and methods, and develop technical skills related to masonry, carpentry, and finish work. Instruction includes safety principles and practices, recognition of standard lumber sizes, foundation layout methods, building concepts and procedures, local, state, and national codes, cost estimating, and blueprint reading.

CARPENTRY I (1 credit) Grades 11, 12

17003A001 Carpentry I CTE Course

This course is designed to introduce students to the Carpentry/Carpenter occupation. Students are instructed in areas of safety, including hand tool, power tool, ladder, scaffolding and the use of safety harnesses. Students are introduced to the theoretical knowledge needed to lay out rafter, stairs, and basic framing techniques. Students demonstrate knowledge of blueprint reading, including foundations, concrete, floor plans, specification schedules, and electrical, plumbing and mechanical symbols. Students demonstrate entry-level skills in all facets of residential construction. Technology-related mathematics, reading, writing, vocabulary, blueprint reading, and science are integrated throughout the curriculum.

CARPENTRY II (1 credit) Grades 11, 12

17003A002 Carpentry II CTE Course

This course provides learning experiences related to the erection, installation, maintenance and repair of building structures and related utilities. Students are instructed in areas of safety, including hand tool, power tool, ladder, scaffolding and the use of safety harnesses. Students demonstrate knowledge of exterior trim and finishes, energy conservation in residential construction, and design of stairs and rafter building. Students gain knowledge of planning and zoning regulations and building codes. Students are introduced to estimating both materials and construction costs, and demonstrate basic knowledge in applying drywall materials, stair-building skills, designing and erecting wall partitions, applying roofing materials, and installing common siding and interior finish. Technology-related mathematics, reading, writing, vocabulary, blueprint reading, and science are integrated throughout the curriculum.

CARPENTRY III (1 credit) Grade 12

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed Carpentry I and II. This course advances student skills and prepares them for the next level of construction. Students are instructed in areas of safety, including hand tool, power tool, ladder, scaffolding and the use of safety harnesses. Students are introduced to the theoretical knowledge needed to lay out rafter, stairs, and basic framing techniques. Students demonstrate knowledge of blueprint reading, including foundations, concrete, floor plans, specification schedules, and electrical, plumbing and mechanical symbols. Students demonstrate entry-level skills in all facets of residential construction. Technology-related mathematics, reading, writing, vocabulary, blueprint reading, and science are integrated throughout the curriculum.

CARPENTRY IV (1 credit) Grade 12

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed Carpentry I, II and III. This course advances student skills and prepares them for the next level of construction. This course provides learning experiences related to the erection, installation, maintenance and repair of building structures and related utilities. Students are instructed in areas of safety, including hand tool, power tool, ladder, scaffolding and the use of safety harnesses. Students demonstrate knowledge of exterior trim and finishes, energy conservation in residential construction, and design of stairs and rafter building. Students gain knowledge of planning and zoning regulations and building codes. Students are introduced to estimating both materials and construction costs, and demonstrate basic knowledge in applying drywall materials, stair-building skills, designing and erecting wall partitions, applying roofing materials, and installing common siding and interior finish. Technology-related mathematics, reading, writing, vocabulary, blueprint reading, and science are integrated throughout the curriculum.

MISCELLANEOUS

MENTORING/SERVICE LEARNING (1 credit) Grade 12. Requires approval from principal. Students will need to provide own transportation.

This class will place high school students in mentoring situations in classrooms in Grades K-5 in the Lewistown Grade Schools.  Students will assist in classroom activities, in tutoring activities with small groups of students and individual students, and will present lessons on selected topics of interest to the high school mentor and appropriate for respective classrooms.  All activities will be under the direct supervision of the classroom teacher and the building administrator. Students will keep reflective journals documenting their experiences and personal growth throughout the experience. Required course reading will include selections related to mentoring and service learning as well as information concerning the developmental stages and needs of young children.  Weekly e-mail communication with class supervisors will be expected. This course is designed for students desiring experience in a human services field, i.e. education, social work, recreation, health care, etc.

Knowledge and Skills Objectives:

  1. Students will gain knowledge of child development and instructional practices appropriate to a variety of grade levels

  2. Students will gain knowledge of the learning process, especially in relationship to children with diverse learning styles and needs

  3. Students will gain knowledge of career skills in human resource fields

  4. Students will develop electronic communication skills

  5. Students will gain direct experience in interaction with young children in instructional and mentoring situations

  6. Students will learn and practice protocols involved in instructional situations

 

Attitudes and Values:

  1. Students will be able to reflect critically upon their experiences to become self-evaluators

  2. Students will develop ability to work independently

  3. Students will develop ability to work cooperatively with others

  4. Students will increase in their levels of self-confidence and self-esteem

  5. Students will direct their own learning

  6. Students will develop leadership potential

  7. Students will develop a sense of empathy for others and a sense of service to their community

 

Learning Activities:    Assignment that will be required before credit will be given

 

  1. Journal keeping

  2. Reflective paper per quarter based on journal writing

  3. Self evaluation

  4. Required readings and corresponding assignments

  5. Weekly discussion groups with the instructor

 

Evaluation:    How class work and participation will be evaluated for a grade

 

  1. Evaluation of supervising teacher

  2. Student self-evaluation

  3. Attendance

  4. Responsibility in journal keeping

  5. Quality of written work in reflective papers

  6. Assigned work related to required readings

  7. Teaching unit or instructional activity

 

WORK STUDY/OFFICE PRACTICE (½ credit) Grade 12

This course is planned to help prepare students for employment upon graduation. Emphasis is placed on office etiquette; proper business behavior; maintaining office equipment; performing clerical duties; organizing and planning; processing mail; receiving visitors, patients or clients; coordinating and performing activities for employer; telephone techniques; filing materials manually, maintaining office supplies and forms; performing telecommunication activities; performing financial activities; preparing written communications; supervising and training; and office equipment applications, as well as a review of grammar, punctuation, and business mathematics. Requires approval from principal.

 

COOPERATIVE WORK EDUCATION (1 credit) Grade 12

This program is designed to provide career and technical educational training experiences through regular part-time employment in the community along with related occupational in-school instruction.  Through the training agreement, the student, employer and coordinator agree on the requirements of the program. These requirements will include the individual learning expectations and experiences with job tasks to be undertaken at the job site. A minimum of 10 hours per week on-the-job training at the learning station (job site) is required with more hours possible. Students must also be enrolled in the Cooperative Education course instructed by the coordinator during the school year and will earn 1 credit for this classroom portion. Student-learners will also earn credit for each block hour of school time working at the job-site. Student-learners must follow all regulations of the class to remain in this program. The coordinator will provide the on-the-job coordination and supervision.

Upon completion of the course:

  1. Complete a sample application form and resume.

  2. Identify and understand the proper way to interview for a job.

  3. Understand the relationships between employee-employer and co-workers.

  4. Identify career and education opportunities in their own career field.

  5. Identify the skills necessary for job promotion.

  6. Recognize and apply essential workplace skills on the job.

  7. Perform at an acceptable level on the job.

Students may apply for Cooperative Education during their junior year. Selection will be made by the coordinator of the program, counselor, and principal.

 

 

LEWISTOWN HIGH SCHOOL

PHYSICAL EDUCATION EXEMPTION POLICY

 

Students in grades 9 through 12 may be excused from participating in physical education for the following reasons:

  1. A physical or emotional condition diagnosed and reported by a person licensed under the Medical Practice Act and submitted to the Superintendent by the student's parents/guardian.  The student shall be provided alternative special activities.

  2. A written statement of objection based on constitutional or religious grounds signed by the parents/guardian and submitted to the Superintendent when a student shall enroll in an academic subject which has been approved by the building principal and for which credit may be earned in lieu of the required credit.

 

Students may be excused from Physical education for the following reason:

  1. Participation in an interscholastic athletic program. The student athlete may take an extra course in lieu of Physical Education.  The student athlete may substitute a semester-long for Physical Education regardless of the length of the sport season.

  2. Enrollment in a specific academic course not included in existing secondary institution the student plans to attend, when the addition of such a course to the student's schedule would result in a course load greater that the district's normal practice.

  3. Enrollment in a class necessary to meet specific state and local graduation requirements when the addition of such a course to the student's schedule would result in a course load greater than the district's normal practice.

 

Students enrolled in Band for the entire year may be exempt from Physical Education, thus allowing them to enroll in an additional course.

 

Lewistown High School District #97 insures that equal educational opportunities are offered to students, regardless or race, color, national origin, age, sex, religion or handicap. Questions in reference to educational opportunities may be directed to:

 

Lewistown High School District #97

15205 N. State Hwy. 100

Lewistown, IL  61542

(309) 547-2288

(309) 547-9870 - fax

 



students who do not pass the course, or decided to withdraw, will be responsible for reimbursing the district a total of $510.00 for the course.